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My soul was inflamed with love whenever I thought of the Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ.

Bl Anne St. Bartholomew

 

Conferences on Other Carmelite Themes


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John Cassian: Mentor to the Carmelite Tradition

Keith Egan T.O.Carm

This presentation is a discussion of the crucial role that John Cassian has played in the development of Carmelite spirituality and implications of his role as a mentor to this tradition.

$9.99


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The New Age in Christ

Kevin Culligan O.C.D.

In this talk, you will not hear about channeling, crystals, tarot cards, theosophy, spiritualism, neo-paganism, witchcraft, or an assortment of other spiritual practices that have come to be included under the new age movement. You will hear about something far more exciting: the New Age that began with the suffering and death of Jesus Christ, his resurrection from the dead, and the coming of his Spirit into our world.

$9.99


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Mystical Phenomena and Carmel’s Women

Kieran Kavanaugh O.C.D.


Teresa teaches us of the many favors derived from God through meditation and contemplation.  Among them are rapture, revelations, and visions.  Yet sanctity does not lie in these favors.  While these favors are not necessary for holiness, they do indeed possess sanctifying effects.

$9.99


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Images Are Forever

John Welch O.Carm

In this talk, Life is Forever, we hear a discussion about the imagery of forever and how this fits into our everyday lives. To us, these may be images that capture our deepest desires, images which hold for us all of the yearnings which we cannot begin to articulate. We all seem to have our own images that really speak deeply to us that are not traditional, are not religious, but they capture what perhaps heaven really is meant to be for us.

$9.99


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Self-Emptying:
Philippians 2 and the Carmelite Tradition

Vilma Seelaus O.C.D.

While we continue to hold in our hearts the self-emptying of the Eternal Word in assuming our human nature, there are other interpretations that bring the concept of self-emptying closer to our personal experience that we might fi
nd meaning in them for our lives today.

$9.99


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Carmel: Born in the Desire for Peace

Patrick McMahon O.Carm

This lecture is on Carmel born in the desire for peace. In the Rule of Saint Albert, there is a chapter on spiritual warfare as an alternative to the violence of the crusades. This idea of the Rule of Saint Albert containing an alternative to violence is especially a pertinent question today when we find ourselves in somewhat of a parallel historical situation with continued tension between Islam and Christianity.

$9.99


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A Theology of Desire

Keith Egan T.O.Carm

From the first chapter in the Song of Songs, the second verse, we discover how a woman’s desire for intimacy, love, and union has for centuries provided inspiration, symbols, and language about the mystical encounter from God. From Origin to Teresa of Jesus and John of the Cross, and Thérèse of Lisieux and beyond, the passionate desires in the Song of Songs have fed the imagination and shaped the consciousness of Christian mystics.

$9.99


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Peacemaking and the Mortification of Desire

Kevin Culligan O.C.D.

The timeliness of nuclear disarmament has not passed as we face the challenges to peace in the new millennium. The Catechism of the Catholic Church is a systematic ordering of the teachings of the church. The Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church is a systematic ordering of the teachings of the church regarding social challenges, social issues, and it’s social doctrine. Both documents vividly bring to our conscious mind the importance for all Christians to be involved in peacemaking.

$9.99


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Mary and Carmel

Emmanuel Sullivan O.C.D.

From its origin in the early 13th Century, the Carmelite Order has been recognized as a distinctively Marian order. Carmel originated with a group of Latin hermits who settled on Mount Carmel at the beginning of that century in the rule of life given to them by Albert the Patriarch of Jerusalem, there is no mention of Mary the Mother of God, yet when we come to see who these anonymous hermits were and why they chose to settle on Mount Carmel, and why they dedicated their small chapel to Mary, we soon realize that they centered their life on Jesus and his Mother.

$9.99


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Liturgy and Personal Spirituality

George Mangiaracina O.C.D.

For many, liturgy and personal spirituality are treated as two separate realities or categories that never meet. It is possible that with the liturgy being in Latin and personal prayer of the faithful being in the language of the person praying, the liturgy began to look more and more like the prayer of priests and religious because they knew Latin. Others looked at liturgy not so much as an ordering of symbolic acts that bought you into the presence of the Trinity, but as a series of causal acts that made Christ present, especially in the bread and wine changed into the body and blood of Christ.

$9.99


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A Theology of Wisdom

Keith Egan T.O.Carm

“Among all human pursuits, the pursuit of wisdom is more perfect, more noble, more useful, and more joyful than anything else you can do.” – Thomas Aquinas. Who of us does not want to be wise? It’s a universal aspiration, but a quest that has numerous facets to it. Cultures passing on a wisdom tradition asking how can you cope with the little and the big questions of life. Perhaps it goes all the way back to Plato who seems to have been the person who told us that philosophy is the love of wisdom.

$9.99


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Carmelite Mysticism as Theology

Vilma Seelaus O.C.D.

Our Carmelite mystics would each have something unique to offer in the exploration of Carmelite mysticism as theology. In this presentation, we learn that through a theology of presence and a theology of silence, John of the Cross constructs a mystical theology of the human person which, as it unfolds, gives deep meaning to the biblical understanding of the human person as created in the divine image and likeness. John’s writings take one ever deeper into the mystery of God.

$9.99


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Falling into the Arms of God:
Perspectives on Aging and Dying

John Welch O.Carm

The title of this talk, Falling into the Arms of God, is from St. Thérèse, the Little Flower, who when she was dying said, “I’m falling into the arms of God.” But not all deaths are as peaceful as falling into the arms of God sounds. And, dying and aging aren’t the same thing. Aging kind of creeps up on us.

$9.99


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The Wisdom of Emptiness

Kevin Culligan O.C.D.


Marvelous existence is true emptiness or true emptiness is marvelous existence. Either way, you have a saying that challenges the assumptions of our American way of life that states that a marvelous way to live is to have more of everything, more money, beauty, reputation, power, pleasure, religious experience. Emptiness sounds like the existence of those who live on the fringes of our society, no home, no security, no influence, no sanity, no say, nothing. What could be so marvelous about that? And where’s the wisdom?

$9.99


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Carmel's Quest for the Living God: A Biblical Approach

Camilo Maccise, OCD

This presentation gives us a Biblical approach to Carmel’s quest for the Living God and is outlined in three points. The first point is the three characteristics of the experience of God in the Bible, the second point is Carmel’s quest of the Living God in the Light of the Bible, and the third point is witnessing and sharing Carmel’s quest of the Living God as a practical point. and action.

$9.99


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Carmel's Quest for the Living God: A Lay Perspective

Dolores Leckey

This lecturer gives us her own lay perspective of how, over many years in her quest for the living God, Carmelites have been pivotal in her own spiritual journey. Her adult spiritual awakening happened when she was 27 and was diagnosed with Rheumatic Fever. A long recovery provided much time for contemplation. She learned to pray and eventually journeyed to Avila and discovered the importance of Teresa’s work. She was impressed by how, in earlier years in the midst of caring for family, civic commitments, attempts to nurture the life of the mind, attending to vocation of marriage, Teresa - a 16th Century mystic, gave her - a lay woman of the 20th Century, both hope and a practical methodology for finding some center in the midst of the complex responsibilities of life.

$9.99


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Carmel's Quest for the Living God: Hope in Dark Times

Fernando Romeral, O. Carm.

Edith Stein and Titus Brandsma may have been the two greatest Carmelites of our modern times. They were, among many other things scholars, intellectuals, mystics, thinkers, and significant figures in the history of the 20th Century in Europe. But above all, they were two seekers of the Living God, two pilgrims in the journey to God. In our modern time, a complicated time for the Church, for religion, for humanity, they help us to assume the challenge to seek, quest, search, and follow the Living God. They were both great intellectuals and scholars and at the same time close to the people. They were both strong and firm in their principles and at the same time human, understanding, flexible. And they were both considered the patron saints of the spiritual union of the whole Carmelite family for many reasons.

$9.99


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For Others and for Ourselves

Fr John Sullivan, O.C.D.

Beginning with the words of Christ, Fr John Sullivan at the 2009 Congress indicates the goal of Carmel’s goal – not to seek some abstract ideas – but to love. Quoting Teresa of Jesus, John of the Cross and Therese of Lisieux, he shows us how we are called to an exterior life of love. Teresa leads us to encounter God in mysticism who “alone suffices” through the ordinary and mundane – through encountering others and the world. Therese in her desire to “spend her heaven doing good on earth” shows us the necessity of our mission to love here. OCDS communities are called to reach out to others for in the words of St John: “where there is no love, to put love and you will find love there.”

$9.99

337 PP

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Forming Vibrant OCDS Communities

Fr Kevin Culligan, O.C.D.

According to the new OCDS constitution, forming vibrant communities is the main challenge facing Carmelite seculars today. Fr Kevin Cullighan in a hope to bring a deeper fervor to the OCDS communities articulates that a vibrant community is in truth a communion of persons whose bond is primarily their faith in Jesus Christ, their love for one another and their adherence to the Christian and Carmelite tradition. True community is rooted in an imitation and participation of our Lord’s own love for His brothers. OCDS communities are called to contemplate this love and then live out this love in their communities and in the world.

$9.99

336 PP

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OCDS Members Serving the Church Today

Fr Thomas Otang’a, O.C.D.

Fr. Thomas shows us a more practical way for the Carmelites to serve the Church in the 21st century, rolling up our sleeves as it were. Beginning with John Paul II’s invocation of all Catholics to participate in the mission of the Church, Fr. Thomas lays our from this a framework by which secular Carmelites might live out this call to mission. To participate in the one mission of God, the secular Carmelites may pursue one of five possibilities: spiritual evolution and adaptation for a vibrant presence in the church, respond to growing opportunities of contemplation in society, support the province mission ad gentes in Kenya, evangelization, or take up publications and retreat ministries. Fr. Thomas goes through each one and gives practical ways to fulfill this universal call to mission.

$9.99

335 PP

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